Resveratrol

Resveratrol is a type of natural phenol produced by plants in response to injury or when the plant is under attack by pathogens such as bacteria or fungi. It has been detected in more than 70 plant species worldwide, including grapes, peanuts, berries, and pines.

DID YOU KNOW

Fresh grape skin contains about 50 to 100 μg of resveratrol per gram net weight which subsequently contributes to a relatively high concentration of resveratrol in red wine and grape juice.

Heart Health

Glucose Tolerance

Improving Metabolism

We often hear about the apparent health benefits of drinking red wine in moderation, sometimes known as “the French paradox,” as this is associated with improved cardiovascular health. The low incidence of heart disease among the French, who eat a relatively high-fat diet, is attributed to amongst other things, the high consumption of red wine in their diet.
As more people take control of their own health by investigating ”alternative” remedies and move away from allopathic medicine, natural products have come under the microscope regarding their potential health benefits for a variety of minor and major, sometimes life-threatening illnesses.

Resveratrol has been examined in relation to the reversal of impaired glucose tolerance or prediabetes. 

Short-term supplementation with resveratrol has been associated with having beneficial effects on glucose and lipid metabolism in individuals with type 2 diabetes which typically occurs in those with impaired glucose tolerance. 

In 2013, a double blind, placebo-controlled, randomised study monitored the effect of oral resveratrol supplementation (1g a day for 45 days) on the control of glucose metabolism in 66 subjects with type 2 diabetes. Comparison of changes between baseline and end-of-study measures between placebo and intervention groups showed that the supplementation of resveratrol had significantly lowered both fasting glucose and fasting insulin concentrations and had improved measures of glycaemic control and insulin sensitivity. Those participants taking resveratrol supplementation also experienced an increase in the beneficial HDL cholesterol.
According to a 2012 Canadian study, resveratrol supplementation could provide similar skeletal muscle benefits as endurance training. The study discovered “combining resveratrol supplementation with exercise training augmented the beneficial effects of exercise alone” and furthermore found that resveratrol supplementation resulted in an increase of endurance, oxidative metabolism, and enhanced cardiac function. In addition, the study concluded the combination of endurance training with resveratrol supplementation resulted in a performance increase of 21%.
One of the functions of resveratrol is that it can stimulate certain metabolic pathways similar to exercise, acting in effect as an exercise mimetic. In the same vein, resveratrol increases the oxygen supply to skeletal muscles whilst also improving cardiac function and regulating cardiac fatty acid, all benefits associated with regular exercise.

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[Supplementation with resveratrol] may have clinical utility in many situations where improved physical performance needs to be augmented due to the patient's inability to perform intense exercise

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References

Szmitko PE, Verma S. Cardiology patient pages. Red wine and your heart. Circulation. 2005 Jan 18;111(2):e10-1. doi: 10.1161/01.CIR.0000151608.29217.62. PMID: 15657377.

Movahed A, Nabipour I, Lieben Louis X, Thandapilly SJ, Yu L, Kalantarhormozi M, Rekabpour SJ, Netticadan T. Antihyperglycemic effects of short term resveratrol supplementation in type 2 diabetic patients. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2013;2013:851267. doi: 10.1155/2013/851267. Epub 2013 Sep 1. PMID: 24073011; PMCID: PMC3773903.

Kan, N. W., Lee, M. C., Tung, Y. T., Chiu, C. C., Huang, C. C., & Huang, W. C. (2018). The Synergistic Effects of Resveratrol combined with Resistant Training on Exercise Performance and Physiological Adaption. Nutrients, 10(10), 1360. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101360

Baltaci, S. B., Mogulkoc, R., & Baltaci, A. K. (2016). Resveratrol and exercise. Biomedical reports, 5(5), 525–530. https://doi.org/10.3892/br.2016.777

 

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